In the News

  • Painter, Kim, USA TODAY, April 20, 2013: When doctors are bullies, patient safety may suffer. Studies ...have found that 5% of physicians in any health care organization account for more than a third of complaints from patients and for 40% of malpractice claims, says Gerald Hickson.
  • How doctors can spot patients likely to sue. amednews.com; posted Feb 4, 2013. Dr. Gerald Hickson supports improved communication and availability to strengthen doctor-provider relationships.
  • Porucznik MA. How to deal with the "problem physicians", 2012 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Fall Meeting symposium. AAOS Now. January 2013.
  • Real reason docs end up in court may surprise you. Physician Risk Management. June 2012; premiere issue:p.4. - Dr. Gerald Hickson explains; they don't work well with others. (Reproduced with permission of publisher.)
  • ID unsolicited complaints - They reveal lititgation risk. Physician Risk Management. June 2012; premiere issue:p.5. Dr. Gerald Hickson explains that just identifying high-risk physicians is not enough. (Reproduced with permission of publisher.)
  • New iPhone "app" helps Vanderbilt University Medical Center monitor hand washing compliance. Observers are trained to have a “cup of coffee” conversation – a collegial reminder – when poor individual compliance is observed. VUMC News-June 17, 2012
  • Humphrey, N. Warning signs: Program assesses malpractice risk and advises physicians of possible danger ahead. Vanderbilt Medicine. 2012;29(1):24-29. - A feature article in Vanderbilt Medicine highlights Dr. Gerald Hickson and the CPPA PARS Program.
  • Humphrey, N. Program helps surgeon prioritize. Vanderbilt Medicine. 2012;29(1):28.- A Vanderbilt surgeon shares his story of how an awareness conversation helped him refocus on patient care.
  • Organization works with physicians to reduce patient complaints and risk. Medical Staff Briefing. March 2006; 16(3): 1, 5-6, 12.
  • Kotulak R. Increase in women doctors changing the face of medicine; Physicians are more patient friendly, but salaries are dropping and the MD shortage is getting worse. Chicago Tribune. January 12, 2005.
  • NPR. Why so Litigious. Talk of the Nation. Aired January 12, 2005.
  • Missouri Commission on Patient Safety. Testimony by Gerald B. Hickson, MD on February 4, 2004. In Report presented to Governor Bob Holden. July, 2004; p.23, 25, 32, 30.
  • Zimmerman R. Doctors' new tool to fight lawsuits: Saying I'm sorry. Wall Street Journal. May 18, 2004; A1.
  • Ostrom CM. Good medicine begins with a good doctor-patient relationship. Seattle Times . March 17, 2004.
  • Saxton JW, Finkelstein MM. Enhanced communication to reduce liability. Physician's News Digest. November 2003.
  • Lapp T. Meeting takes new tack on patient safety. AAFP FPReportOnline: Post-assembly edition. (American Academy of Family Physicians, National Ambulatory Primary Care Research and Education Conference on Patient Safety). November 2003.
  • Bell J. Study of medical errors puts tentative price tag on impact Hospital charges alone boosted $9.3 billion a year. Baltimore Sun . October 8, 2003.
  • Rice B. Why some doctors get sued more than others. Medical Economics. 2003 Jul 11;80(13):73-77. PMID: 12931518
  • Bhatt S. Florida's malpractice insurance crisis: Malpractice alternative pays less. The Palm Beach Post (FL) . June 15, 2003.
  • Risk management. Medical Risk Mgmt Advisor . 2003;11(2nd Quarter): 1-2.
  • Coomer J, Govern P. Hickson named associate dean for Vanderbilt patient advocacy. The Reporter. March 7, 2003.
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Publications and research: Counseling of physicians at high risk of malpractice claims lowers the level of patient complaints. September 2002.
  • Govern P. Vanderbilt team outlines malpractice risk in JAMA. The Reporter. June 14, 2002.
  • Govern P. Demystifying malpractice risk. The Reporter. April 26, 2002.
  • Roberts J. News: Doctors sued for uninterest, say researchers in US. BMJ. 1994 Dec; 309(6967):1491. PMCID: PMC2541615
  • Friend T. Patients might sue less if MDs would talk more. USA Today. March 11, 1992: D1.