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1. Why do some forms have MC#'s and some have 60-#'s? 2. What is an 1180? And by the way, why does everybody call it an 1180?
3. What is a meter mail slip and how does it differ from the 1180? 4. How can I return a forms order?
5. Why do we have a Forms Policy? 6. What is the Forms Committee?
7. How do I order prescription pads? 8. Can I typeset my own form?
9. How can I equip my computer to access the forms listed in PDF format on this site? 10. How can I get my favorite form made available for download on this website?
11. What is being done about foreign language forms? 12. What is an I-9 form and where can I get one?
13. How do I order campus envelopes and Vanderbilt watermark bond paper? 14. How can I get a form translated?

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Why do some forms have MC#'s and some have 60- numbers?

The primary distinction is that MC forms are used in the Medical Center. (MC? Get it? We're clever dogs at Forms Management.) These are virtually all produced by the Medical Center Copy Center, which also issues the forms and assigns MC form numbers.

By contrast, 60- forms exceed the printing capabilites we have on-campus and/or are used campus-wide.  These are held and issued by the University's chosen outside forms vendor. (Currently that's Standard Register.) Procurement handles ordering for these items.

There are always a few exeptions at Vanderbilt, of course—a few MC forms are approved for use campus-wide. To view them, click here.

For a rundown on ordering both types of forms, click here.

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2. What is an 1180? And by the way, why does everybody call it an 1180?

The 1180 form is essentially the dollar bill of Vanderbilt—the basic currency you need to make anything happen. Its full title is "Requisition for Supplies from Stock and Other Internal Charges" (whew) and it is what you normally use for ordering MC forms.

When signed by an authorized person, this document directs the Department of Finance (Medical Center) or the Office of Accounting (University) to transfer funds from one budget to another. The copy you keep is like a canceled check—it documents what funds you spent, when, and for what. The 1180 is one of the 60- forms described above and is ordered through Purchasing.

As for why it's called an 1180, well, thereby hangs a tale. Once upon a time, when the Vanderworld was new (not yet 100 years old), we had black dial phones, no post-it notes, and a storeroom that filed forms under numbers starting with "1-". Yes, you guessed it--the requisition form was number 1-1180.

In later years, the "60-" numbers scheme replaced the 1-'s and the requisition was assigned number 60-005-802. However, the old hands persisted in calling it the 1180, the new hands didn't know what they were talking about, and finally a compromise had to be reached.

The form still has its 60- number, but the old number was brought back and added in as part of the title. And that, Vanderhands of all ages, is why everybody's favorite form has two numbers. See the illustration below.

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3. What is a meter mail slip and how does it differ from the 1180?

The two forms are similar in size and function. Both authorize the transfer of funds, but the meter mail slip is preprinted with special postage budget numbers and so can only be used for the dispatch of mail.

Due to these numbers, separate forms are used by the Medical Center Post Office (Station 17) and the University's Post Office (Station B); the two cannot process each other's slips.

The Medical Center slip is number 60-005-826 and is distinguished mainly by its blue top copy. The University slip has a white top copy and bears number 60-005-811.

To view a copy of the Medical Center slip from our Post Office website, click here.

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4. How can I return a forms order?

The Forms Policy sets specific conditions on returns. To view the applicable policy section, click here.

A return meeting these conditions will be accepted by any authorized vendor, on- or off-campus.

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5. Why do we have a Forms Policy?

VUMC has had a Forms Policy for about thirty years. It was originally created to ensure that all the institution's forms would be cost-effective and adhere to sound therapeutic, legal, and financial standards.

Today, although electronic systems play a far greater role than they did then, forms are still a critical part of our patient care and administrative framework. The Forms Policy has been revised a number of times, but still concentrates mainly on its original goals.

Since the early 90's, the Forms Committee has periodically issued guidelines that supplement the policy and provide flexible, up-to-date guidance on forms issues.

To view the policy, click here.

To view the guidelines, click here.

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6. What is the Forms Committee?

The Forms Policy mandates the existence of a committee to oversee VUMC's forms and spells out the areas that should be represented. To view the applicable policy section, click here.

The committee meets on an occasional basis to consider revisions to the Forms Policy and its accompanying guidelines.

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7. How do I order prescription pads?

Prescription pads are covered in some detail in the Forms Guidelines— click here.

Within these guidelines, your may order with an 1180 from the Copy Center as with any other MC form.  However, for security reasons, prescription pads data may not be browsed on our Forms Access page.

(We did consider posting a sample of the standard Rx format here, by the way, but concluded it might be open to abuse. If you need to see a sample, contact the Copy Center.)

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8. Can I typeset my own form?

Yes—there is a section of the forms guidelines that addresses just this issue. To view it, click here.

Please keep in mind, though, that you will be responsible for tracking and maintaining the electronic file. If revisions are needed later and the original file cannot be found, Forms Management will be happy to retypeset if needed, but normal typesetting charges will apply.

(To view typesetting prices from our Copy Center site, click here.)

If you are creating a Medical Record form, we have handy templates available in Word that will start you out in the format required by the policy. Download them here:  Front side or Back side.

A SPECIAL NOTE ON CHECKBOXES: A great majority of forms have checkboxes on them. Too often, though, we find these are the toughest parts of the form to process when the typesetting has been done on another computer. We have discovered that there is a reason:

Windows has several checkbox characters available in its Wingdings font set, and these translate well to other computers. (To access these and other special characters, you can use the Windows Character Map utility. To learn how, click here.)

However, many Windows fonts have box-like things in them which are not really box characters at all. These are simply placeholders to indicate that the font does not have a character in that particular location. Although it may look OK when first typeset, when the file is opened later on another system, these phantom boxes either will not print at all or will print as some other character. Below are examples of "good" boxes and "bad" boxes:

If you typeset your own forms to send us for printing, please stick to the good boxes!

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9. How can I equip my computer to access the forms listed in PDF format on this site?

You will need the Adobe Acrobat Reader plug-in program for your browser. This small utility is available free and is not difficult to install. For a full explanation, click here.

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10. How can I get my favorite form made available for download on this website?

The Forms Guidelines spell out certain criteria for forms to be considered as suitable for web-posting:

(To go to this document, click here.)

These criteria have been carefully formulated to minimize VUMC's cost, address liability issues, and allow for the production requirements of different types of forms. Within these guidelines, we welcome your suggestions for adding new forms to the site. Please send your suggestions to the Department Director as listed on our "Feedback" page—to go there, click here.

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11. What is being done about foreign language forms?

VUMC's clientele is being more and more multicultural and our written communication are evolving to reflect that fact.

The Office of Patient Affairs is spearheading the institution's drive to meet this need and has hired a coordinator for translation services, Johannie Resto.

Contact Johannie with any questions or concerns you may have about serving patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP).

Forms Management is working with Patient Affairs on this issue and we have designed the capability to download foreign language forms into this website. It is anticipated that as more alternate language forms are developed, they will be made available through the Copy Center's usual ordering process as well.

Our Forms Guidelines address the processing and approval of foreign language forms. To view this section of the document, click here.

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12. What is an I-9 form and where can I get one?

The I-9 is a U.S. Government form, from the Immigration and Naturalization Service. It is used to certify that a new employee is eligible to work in the United States.

This form is available from Human Resources Records Management (HRRM) or can be downloaded as a PDF file from the INS website by clicking here.

To see an example of a completed form, click here.

Vanderbilt Human Resources has an instruction document on the use of this form here.

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13. How can I order campus envelopes and watermark bond?

These come from Campus Distribution Services, a division of Vanderbilt University Printing.

They do allow ordering via their website, but you must have a VUnet ID and password.

For a PDF flyer on how to order off-line, click here.

 

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14. How can I get a form translated?

This is handled by VU Interpreter Services.  There is information on their website here.

 

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