Anthony Fauci: Unfinished business  pg. 7

What gives him such energy? “It is an indescribable experience,” Fauci told the NIH Historical Office, “knowing that what you are doing will have an impact on the lives of tens, if not hundreds, of millions of people.” Yet he makes time to run every day, and for family time around the dinner table. He and his wife have three daughters.

In the midst of juggling his administrative duties and numerous speaking engagements, Fauci continues to do research and see patients on that historic 11th floor unit. He is the quintessential physician-scientist. “If it were not for the basic research observations that are made,” he explains, “the drugs that we have for HIV, the things we’re doing with vaccines would never have happened.”

And he continues to worry—about the next emerging infection, and about the vagaries of world politics that make it difficult to keep up the fight against AIDS.

“I think the United States has shown an incredible amount of leadership,” Fauci says. “My concern is that the rest of the world doesn’t step to the plate, and we miss a golden opportunity to have a major impact on HIV/AIDS. Because we have the tools now. We’ve got drugs. We know how to prevent it. We can do it. But we can’t do it alone.”

“It is an indescribable experience, knowing that what you are doing will have an impact on the lives of tens, if not hundreds, of millions of people.” —Anthony Fauci, M.D.
Photo by Paul Fetters

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