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Transgenic Technologies

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Cell-specific gene targeting in mice has provided researchers with invaluable tools enabling analysis of the developmental, physiologic and pathologic importance of proteins expressed in the kidney. In particular, renal cell-specific Cre recombinase expression, either constitutive or temporally-regulated, has been employed to great advantage. Despite great interest in this powerful technology, few laboratories have successfully developed renal cell-specific Cre expressing mice.  Through the combined reagents and expertise availlable through faculty members at the University of Utah and Vanderbilt Nephrology Divisions, the Trangenic Core will provide access to established transgenic lines and will develop new renal cell-specific transgenic animals that will be availlable to the renal research community.  The Core will also maintain a dedicated, upto date and interactive renal specific transgenic database that will provide a centralized, comprehensive resource for the wider renal research community. 

The following mouse lines are currently being developed by the Core: 1) distal tubule-specific Cre expression; 2) thick ascending limb-specific Cre expression; 3) temporally regulated thick ascending limb-specific Cre expression; and 4) temporally regulated collecting duct- principal cell-specific Cre expression. The Core faculty will also be able to provide expert advice and assistance with the development of other renal cell-specific transgenic mice in other laboratories if requested.  For example, while our primary focus will be on the generation of both inducible and not inducible Cre lines, we will be able to assist with the generation of renal cell-specific mice expressing other genes, including shRNAs. The common denominator will be renal cell-specific expression.

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Last updated on 2013-11-06 Moderated by: Donald Kohan

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