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Department of Infection Prevention

Type of Isolation Needed (Isolation Quick Links)

 Need specific isolation information for a given infection or pathogen? 

Click here for easy access to the VUMC isolation policies and guidelines or search for the infection/pathogen using the alphabet links below:

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 

Commonly-Searched Organisms/Infections:

Acute Respiratory Illness in Children (During Winter Respiratory Virus Season) 

C. difficile

Influenza (Seasonal)

Meningococcal meningitis (confirmed or suspected)

MRSA

MRSE (Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcus)

Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter

Pertussis

RSV

Scabies/Lice

Tuberculosis (Pulmonary) 

Varicella (Chickenpox/Disseminated Zoster/Single Dermatome Zoster in Immunocompromised Patient)

VRE

  

A

 Abscess: 

    Adult:  No dressing or adequate containment of drainage 

    Children:  Any soft tissue abscess

Acinetobacter baumannii, multidrug-resistant

Acquired human immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

Acute Respiratory Illness in Children (During Winter Respiratory Virus Season) 

Adenovirus
 
 
 
     Pneumonia

Amebiasis

Anthrax:  [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

     Cutaneous

     Pulmonary

     Aerosolizable spore-containing powder or other substance

 Antibiotic-associated colitis (see Clostridium difficile)

Aspergillosis

Avian influenza (see Influenza, avian)

 

B

Blastomycosis

Botulism

Bronchiolitis (see Respiratory infections in infants and young children)

 

C

 Campylobacter gastroenteritis (see Gastroenteritis)

 Candidiasis, all forms including mucocutaneous

 Cat-scratch fever (benign inoculation lymphoreticulosis)

 Chickenpox (see Herpes Zoster)

 Cholera (see Gastroenteritis)

Clostridium difficile

Coccidioidomycosis

Conjunctivitis:

    Acute bacterial

    Chlamydia

    Gonococcal

    Acute viral (acute hemorrhagic)

Coronavirus associated with SARS (see SARS)

Coxsackie virus disease (see Enteroviral infections)

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, CJD, vCJD [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

Croup (see Respiratory infections in infants and young children)

Cryptococcosis

Cryptosporidiosis (see Gastroenteritis)

Cytomegalovirus infection, neonatal or immunosuppressed

 

D

 Diarrhea, acute-infective etiology suspected (see Gastroenteritis)

 

E

 Ebola virus [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

 Echovirus (see Enteroviral infections)

 Encephalitis or encephalomyelitis (see specific etiologic agents)

 Enterococcus species (see Multidrug-resistant organisms if epidemiologically significant or vancomycin resistant)

 Enterocolitis, C. difficile (see C. difficile, Gastroenteritis)

 Enteroviral infections

 Epiglottitis, due to Haemophilus influenzae type b

 Epstein-Barr virus infection, including infectious mononucleosis

 Erythema infectiosum (also see Parvovirus B19)

  

F

Furunculosis, staphylococcal:

    Infants and young children

    MRSA

 

G

Gastroenteritis:

    Adenovirus

     Campylobacter species 

     Cholera

     C. difficile

     Cryptosporidium species

     E. coli:

         Enteropathogenic O157:H7 and other shiga toxin-producing strains

         Other species

     Giardia lamblia

     Noroviruses

     Rotavirus

     Salmonella species (including S. typhi)

     Shigella species

     Vibrio parahaemolyticus

     Viral (if not covered elsewhere)

        Yersinia enterocolitica

 Giardiasis (see Gastroenteritis)

 Gonorrhea

 

H

Haemophilus influenzae type b, known or suspected 

Hand, foot, and mouth disease (see Enteroviral infections)

 Hepatitis, viral:

     Type A:

         Diapered or incontinent patients

     Type B-HbsAg positive; acute or chronic

     Type C and other unspecified non-A, non-B

     Type D (seen only with hepatitis B)

     Type E: 

          Diapered or incontinent patients

    Type G

 Herpes simplex (HSV): 

     Encephalitis

     Mucocutaneous, disseminated or primary, severe

     Mucocutaneous, recurrent (skin, oral, genital)

     Neonatal

 Herpes zoster (VZV, varicella-zoster, shingles):

   Disseminated disease in any patient

   Localized disease in immunocompromised patient

   Localized disease in patient with intact immune system

Histoplasmosis

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

Human metapneumovirus

 

I

Impetigo

Infectious mononucleosis

Influenza:

     Human (seasonal influenza)

     Pandemic influenza (including avian influenza)  [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

 

K

Kawasaki syndrome 

 

L

Legionnaires’ disease/Legionella

Lice:

     Head (pediculosis)

     Body

     Pubic

Listeriosis

Lyme disease

 

M

Malaria

Measles (rubeola)  [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

Meningitis:

    Aseptic (nonbacterial or viral; also see Enteroviral infections):

          Infants and young children

 

          All others

     Bacterial, gram-negative enteric, (not multidrug-resistant)

     Fungal

     Haemophilus influenzae, type b known or suspected

     Listeria monocytogenes

     Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcal) known or suspected

     Streptococcus pneumoniae

     M. tuberculosis

     Other diagnosed bacterial (if not multidrug-resistant organism or noted elsewhere in this section) 

     Unknown pathogen, suspected bacterial

  

Meningococcal disease: sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis

Monkeypox  [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

Multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), infection or colonization (e.g., MRSA, VRE, VISA/VRSA, Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, ESBLs)

Mumps (infectious parotitis)

Mycobacteria, nontuberculosis (atypical)

Mycoplasma pneumonia

 

N

Necrotizing enterocolitis

Norovirus (see Gastroenteritis)

Norwalk agent gastroenteritis (see Gastroenteritis)

 

P

Parainfluenza virus infection, respiratory in infants and young children

Parvovirus B19

Pediculosis (lice)

Pertussis (whooping cough)

Plague (Yersinia pestis[*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

    Bubonic

    Pneumonic

Pneumonia:

    Adenovirus

    Bacterial not listed elsewhere (including gram-negative bacterial)

    Burkholderia cepacia 

    Chlamydia

    Fungal

    Haemophilus influenzae, type b

        Adults

        Infants and children

    Legionella spp.

    Meningococcal

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial (see Multidrug-resistant organisms)

    Mycoplasma (primary atypical pneumonia)

    Pneumococcal pneumonia

     Pneumocystis jiroveci (Pneumocystis carinii)

     Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA)

     Streptococcus, group A

     Varicella-zoster (See Herpes Zoster)

     Viral

         Adults

         Infants and young children (see Respiratory infectious disease, acute)

 Prion disease (See Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease) 

 

Q

 Q fever

  

R

 Rabies  [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

 Resistant bacterial infection or colonization (see Multidrug-resistant organisms)

Respiratory infectious disease, acute (if not covered elsewhere):

    Adults

    Infants and young children

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infants, young children and immunocompromised adults

Rheumatic fever

Rhinovirus

Rickettsial fevers, tickborne (Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tickborne typhus fever)

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Rotavirus infection (see Gastroenteritis)

Rubeola (see Measles)

 

S

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)  [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

Salmonellosis (see Gastroenteritis)

Scabies

Smallpox (variola; see Vaccinia for management of vaccinated persons)  [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

Staphylococcal disease (S. aureus):

    Skin, wound, or burn:

        No dressing or drainage not adequately contained

    Enterocolitis

    Multidrug-resistant (see Multidrug-resistant organisms)

    Pneumonia (non-MRSA)

    Scalded skin syndrome

    Toxic shock syndrome (due to MRSA) 

Streptococcal disease (group A streptococcus):

    Skin, wound, or burn:

         No dressing or dressing does not contain wound drainage adequately 

     Endometritis (puerperal sepsis)

     Pharyngitis in infants and young children

     Pneumonia

     Scarlet fever in infants and young children

     Serious invasive disease

    Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome (suspected or confirmed)

Streptococcal disease (group B streptococcus), neonatal

Streptococcal disease (not group A or B) unless covered elsewhere

Strongyloidiasis

Syphilis:

     Latent (tertiary) and seropositivity without lesions

     Skin and mucous membrane, including congenital, primary, secondary

 

T

 Toxic shock syndrome (empiric; if pathogen known, see staphylococcal disease or streptococcal disease)

 Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (see Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, CJD, vCJD)

 Tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis):

     Extrapulmonary, draining lesion

     Extrapulmonary, no draining lesion or evidence for pulmonary disease

     Pulmonary or laryngeal disease, confirmed 

     Pulmonary or laryngeal disease, suspected

     Skin-test positive with no evidence of current active disease

 

U

 Urinary tract infection (including pyelonephritis), with or without urinary catheter, non-MDR organism 

  

V

 Vaccinia (smallpox vaccination complications):  [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*]

                Eczema vaccinatum

          Fetal vaccinia

          Generalized vaccinia

          Progressive vaccinia

          Postvaccinia encephalitis

          Blepharitis or conjunctivitis

          Iritis or keratitis

               Vaccinia-associated erythema multiforme (Stevens Johnson Syndrome)

Varicella (see Herpes Zoster) 

Variola (see Smallpox)

Viral hemorrhagic fevers (e.g. Lassa, Ebola, Marberg Viruses) [*NOTIFY INFECTION CONTROL & PREVENTION ASAP*] 

 Viral respiratory diseases (not covered elsewhere):

        Adults

        Infants and young children (see Respiratory infectious disease, acute)

 

W

Whooping cough (see Pertussis)

Wound infections:  

         Draining and no dressing or dressing does not contain drainage adequately 

 

Y

Yersinia enterocolitica gastroenteritis (see gastroenteritis)

 

 Z

Zoster (varicella-zoster)  (see Herpes zoster)

  

 

 

 

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