.

Vanderbilt Department of Neurology

Faculty By Divisions


Lori Jordan, M.D., Ph.D.

Biographical Sketch

Lori C. Jordan, M.D., Ph.D. earned her B.S. in Biology from the College of William and Mary in Virginia, graduating Phi Beta Kappa. She then received her medical degree (M.D.) from the University of Oklahoma and her Ph.D. in Clinical Investigation from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She completed residencies in Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology as well as a fellowship in Cerebrovascular Neurology (Stroke) at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. After completing her training, Dr. Jordan was on staff at John Hopkins Hospital for several years. There, she was Director of the Pediatric Stroke Program and Co-Director of the Pediatric Neurovascular Center. In 2011, she joined the faculty at Vanderbilt in the divisions of Pediatric Neurology and Stroke in the Department of Neurology. Dr. Jordan is Assistant Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics.

Dr. Jordan has particular expertise in ischemic stroke, brain hemorrhage, vascular malformations and the neurological complications of sickle cell disease. She is one of only a handful of child neurologists in the world with formal, subspecialty training in cerebrovascular neurology. She is Director of the Pediatric Stroke Program at Monroe Carell, Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. 
 
Dr. Jordan’s clinical research program focuses on predicting and improving outcome after hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in children. She is also a member of the John F. Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development.

Research Summary

My clinical research program focuses on predicting and improving outcome after hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in children. Stroke is as common as brain tumor in children but is vastly understudied. Children who suffer a stroke in childhood have decades to live with their neurological deficits, and typical motor and cognitive development is often disrupted. Currently, my clinical research laboratory is focused on finding predictors of good recovery and poor neurological outcome after stroke as potential targets for intervention and improved care for children with stroke. We are also working to improve methods of outcome measurement in this field. 

I am also a co-investigator in several national, multi-center studies of childhood stroke. I am involved in multidisciplinary collaborations with physicians in pediatric hematology to study stroke prevention and treatment in children with sickle cell disease. 

Selected Publications

Engelmann KA, Jordan LC. Outcome Measures Utilized in Pediatric Stroke Studies – A Systematic Review. Arch Neurol 2011; accepted for publication.
 
Kleinman JT, Beslow LA, Engelmann K, Smith SE, Licht DJ, Ichord RN, Jordan LC. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral Hemorrhage. J Child Neurol 2011; accepted for publication.
 
Jordan LC, Hillis AE. Challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric stroke. Nat Rev Neurol 2011;7:199-208.
 
Ichord RN, Bastian R, Abraham L, Askalan R, Benedict S, Bernard TJ, Beslow L, Deveber G, Dowling M, Friedman N, Fullerton H, Jordan L, Kan L, Kirton A, Amlie-Lefond C, Licht D, Lo W, McClure C, Pavlakis S, Smith SE, Tan M, Kasner S, Jawad AF. Interrater reliability of the Pediatric National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (PedNIHSS) in a multicenter study. Stroke. 2011;42:613-617.
 
Kleinman JT, Hillis AE, Jordan, LC. ABC/2: a bedside method for estimating ICH volume and total brain volume in children. Dev Med Child Neurol 2010, 2011;53:281-284.
 
Jordan, LC, Rafay MF, Smith SE, Askalan R, Zamel KM, deVeber G, Ashwal SAntithrombotic treatment in neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis: results of the international pediatric stroke study. J Pediatr 2010;156:704-710.
Jordan LC, McKinstry RC, Kraut MA, Ball WS, Vendt BA, Casella JF, DeBaun MR, Strouse JJ. Incidental Findings on Brain MRI of Children with Sickle Cell Disease. Pediatrics 2010;126:53-61.
Sepelyak K, Gailloud P, Jordan LC. Athletics, Minor Trauma, and Pediatric Arterial Ischemic Stroke. Euro J Ped 2010;169:557-562.
Beslow LA, Licht DJ, Smith SE, Storm PB, Heuer GG, Zimmerman RA, Feiler AM, Kasner SE, Ichord RN, Jordan LC. Predictors of outcome in childhood intracerebral hemorrhage: a prospective consecutive cohort study. Stroke 2010;41:313-318.
Jordan LC, Johnston SC, Wu YW, Sidney SS, Fullerton HJ. The importance of cerebral aneurysms in childhood hemorrhagic stroke: a population-based study. Stroke 2009;40:400-405.
Jordan, LC, Kleinman JT, Hillis AE. Intracerebral Hemorrhage Volume Predicts Poor Outcome in Children. Stroke 2009;40:1666-1671.
Jordan LC, Wityk RJ, Dowling MM, DeJong MR, Comi AM. Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound in Children with Sturge-Weber Syndrome. J Child Neurol 2008;23:137-143.
Jordan LC, Hillis AE. Hemorrhagic stroke in childhood. Pediatr Neurol 2007;36:73-80.
Strouse JJ, Hulbert ML, DeBaun MR, Jordan LC, Casella JF. Primary hemorrhagic stroke in children with sickle cell disease is associated with recent transfusion and use of corticosteroids. Pediatrics 2006;118:1916-1924.
Burger IM, Murphy KJ, Jordan LC, Tamargo RJ, Gailloud P. Safety of Cerebral Digital Subtraction Angiography in Children. Complication Rate Analysis in 241 Consecutive Diagnostic Angiograms. Stroke 2006;37:2535-2539.

Contact Information

2200 Children's Way, 9th Floor

Nashville, TN 37232

Phone: 615-936-5536

Fax: 615-936-8094

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