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The Department of Radiology & Radiological Sciences

DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY & RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH EDUCATION PROGRAMS

The Section of Radiological Sciences consists of a group of basic scientists under the direction of Dr. Ron Price who provide the quality assurance basis for the high-technology medical imaging modalities within the department and provide clinical translational support for these modalities. In addition, this group of physicists, biomedical engineers, radiobiologists, and chemists contribute to basic research and teach the principles of medical imaging to residents, medical students, graduate students, and students in the allied health professions.

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Cancer Imaging Research

Eligibility: Recent Ph.D. or M.D. with interest in advanced research training in the development and use of new imaging techniques and modalities in cancer research. A background in imaging or cancer biology is required. Candidates must be citizens or non-citizen nationals who have been lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence. Individuals on temporary visas are not eligible.

Description: The training program is jointly sponsored by Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Meharry Medical College, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science and the Vanderbilt-Ingram Comprehensive Cancer Center.
 
Active areas of research include both small animal and human imaging projects. Multiple mouse models of human cancer are under investigation with SPECT, PET, x-ray computed tomography, power Doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Small animal research facilities include µ PET, µ CT, µ MRI (4.7T, 7T and 9.4T). Human facilities include dedicated 3T MRI and CT scanners and shared clinical MRI (4), CT (5), PET/CT and an 11 MeV negative-ion cyclotron for radioisotope production. Human investigations include molecular and gene-expression imaging and quantifications of tumor growth, metabolism and therapy response and the development of cancer-specific imaging probes for both PET and MRI. Fellowship duration will normally be 2 years depending upon experience. Fellows will be mentored in both imaging and cancer biology disciplines. Supported in part by a grant from the National Institute of Health (5 R25 CA92043).

Master of Science in Medical Physics (MSMP)

 
Eligibility:  Bachelor’s Degree in Physics, Applied Physics, Physical Science, or Engineering (with the equivalent of a minor in physics) from an accredited college or university.  Students from non-English speaking countries are required to demonstrate proficiency in English by submitting results of both the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and Test of Spoken English (TSE) exams. The minimal acceptable score on the TOEFL exam is 600 and on the TSE exam is 300.
 
Description:  The MS Medical Physics Program is divided into two disciplines of medical physics: imaging and radiotherapy physics. The two divisions are similar in that each has thesis and a non-thesis option and both require 32 semester credit hours of didactic classroom and laboratory instruction and 6 semester professional credit hours of practicum (clinic rotations). The two divisions differ in that the clinical rotations are specific to the areas of clinical diagnostic and nuclear medicine imaging for the medical physics imaging discipline, and radiotherapy treatment planning and associated techniques for the radiotherapy physics discipline.   Click HERE for more detailed information.

Doctorate in Medical Physics (DMP)

 
Eligibility: Bachelor’s Degree in Physics, Applied Physics, Physical Science, or Engineering (with the equivalent of a minor in physics) from an accredited college or university.  Students from non-English speaking countries are required to demonstrate proficiency in English by submitting results of both the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and Test of Spoken English (TSE) exams. The minimal acceptable score on the TOEFL exam is 600 and on the TSE exam is 300.
 
Description: The DMP Medical Physics Program is a 4 year professional degree with a specialty in Radiological Medical Physics. Both imaging physics and radiotherapy tracts are offered.   Both tracts require 50 semester credit hours of didactic classroom instruction with laboratories, 6 semester credit hours of independent study, and 36 professional credit hours of clinical training in the form of clinical rotations over a minimum of 24 months. Click HERE for more detailed information.