.

Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology

 

COURSES

 

School of Medicine Course

 

VMS 564-5020/Microbiology and Immunology/ Van Kaer

A multidisciplinary course which provides a comprehensive study of microbiology and immunology encompassing the molecular cell biology of microbial agents and the immune system, review of pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and parasites. The course consists of lectures, conferences, laboratory sessions and problem-based small group discussions focused on different pathogen-host relationships.

 

Graduate School Courses

 

M&IM 327: Experimental Methods

Laboratory work concerned with: (a) regulation of gene transcription; (b) signal transducing molecules and pathways; (c) entry and replication of mammalian viruses; (d) techniques in nucleic acid and peptide chemistry, rapid methods of DNA sequencing, gene knock-out in transgenic animals, design of probes, antigens, and synthetic vaccines; and (e) structure-function analysis of ligands, receptors, toxins, and transcription factors. Admission to course, hours and credit by arrangement. Aiken (DGS)

Aiken/2-4/Fall or Spring

 

M&IM 328-2: Molecular Virology

The interaction of animal viruses with their host cells, discussed at the molecular and cellular level as model systems. Special emphasis on current literature and methodology. Prerequisite: A course in biochemistry

Aiken/Dermody/2-3/Fall

 

M&IM 328-3: Molecular and Cellular Immunology

The cellular and molecular foundations of the immune response system and the humoral and cellular reactions that result from immunologic interactions. Two to three lectures per week and seminars presented by students. Prerequisite: IGP 300a, 300b, and 301, or equivalent.

Joyce(Director)/2-3/Fall

 

M&IM 328-4: Focal Topics in Microbiology and Immunology

The main objective of this course is to guide students through "real life" cases illustrating dynamic features (entry, colonization, spread, injury, immune response) of the pathogen-host relationship. Small discussion groups led by a faculty preceptor will focus on twelve topics contained in booklets designed for self-directed study. The element of critical thinking in analysis of questions, concepts, and required literature will be introduced. Moreover, graduate students will gain "clinical perspective" to the molecular pathogenesis of microbial and immune diseases important for future research proposals and grant applications. Prerequisite: IGP 300a, 300b, 301, or equivalent. All students must receive course director approval prior to registration.

Van Kaer/2/Spring

 

M&IM 332: Foundations of Microbiology and Immunology I

The objectives of this course are to alert students to important original research articles in the area of microbial genetics and pathogenesis, to apply methods of scientific logic for critical analysis of the knowledge presented in the articles, and to help students present complex data and conclusions to an audience.

Cover/Lacy/Summer

 

M&IM 333: Foundations of Microbiology and Immunology II

Second semester of required course work. The objectives of this course are to alert students to important original research articles in the area of molecular virology and immunology, to apply methods of scientific logic for critical analysis of the knowledge presented in the articles, and to help students present complex data and conclusions to an audience. Prerequisite: M&IM 332.

Ruley/3/Fall

 

M&IM 334: Foundations of Microbiology and Immunology III

Third semester of required course work. The objectives of this course are to alert students to important original research articles in the area of molecular immunology, to apply methods of scientific logic for critical analysis of the knowledge presented in the articles, and to help students present complex data and conclusions to an audience. Prerequisite: M&IM 333.

Boothby/1/Spring

 

M&IM 335: Research Proposals - Preparation & Critical Review

An essential skill for scientists in an academic setting is the ability to obtain extramural research funding through peer reviewed grant applications. This course will offer didactic sessions in which the process of preparing and reviewing grant applications is discussed. Each student will write a grant application using the NRSA format for postdoctoral fellowships. The student should propose research in one of the four major emphasis areas of the department: microbial genetics, virology, immunology, or microbial pathogenesis. The initial grant submission will be reviewed by a faculty mentor. The student will amend the application according to the reviewer’s comments and submit a final version. Procedures for reviewing grant applications will then be discussed. Two students and the original faculty mentor will provide a written review for each of the final grants. The course will conclude with a mock NIH study section in which grants are reviewed orally and scored

Crowe(Director)/Thomas/Cover/2/Spring

 

M&IM 350: Cellular Microbiology of the Pathogen-Host Interaction

(Also listed as Cell Biology 350). An interdisciplinary course designed to train students at the interface of molecular microbiology and cell biology. Model organisms or their products will be analyzed in the context of molecular cell biology. Students will be challenged to utilize new information from microbial genome sequencing to understand host cell subcellular compartments and signaling pathways. Prerequisite: A solid background at the graduate or undergraduate level in natural science curriculum, for example molecular cell biology, microbiology and immunology. All students must receive course director approval prior to registration.

Skaar/2/Spring

 

M&IM 351: Functional Genomics and Proteomics - Applications to Immunobiology

An interdisciplinary course designed to train predoctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in biological applications of functional genomics and proteomics in immunobiology. The topics include: 1) proteomic analysis of blood cells, vascular endothelia cells and smooth muscle cells involved in immunity and inflammation, 2) functional genomics of immunobiology using genome-wide mutagenesis, 3) gene expression profiling of immune/inflammatory responses based on DNA microarray technology, 4) peptide/protein transduction and its applications to cell-based proteomics and intracellular protein therapy, 5) proteomic analysis of MHC antigens, 6) genomics and proteomic analysis of host-pathogen interactions, 7) genomic and proteomic analysis of inflammatory and immune diseases and 7) development and application of new genomic and proteomic strategies in immunobiology.

Link/staff/2/Spring

 

M&IM 353: Microbial Diseases

Microbial Diseases is 1-credit lecture based course that will survey the infectious diseases that are of the greatest importance to global public health.  Infectious Diseases are responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality, and the diseases covered in this course are the most common causes of lethal infection in the world.  Microbial Diseases is open to all graduate students and postdoctoral fellows and there are no prerequisites for this course.  The course will survey the leading causes of infection with a focus on incidence, route of infection, symptoms, and treatment.  Upon completion of this course, students will have a strong understanding of the infectious diseases of global medical significance. 

Skaar/1/Spring

 

M&IM 369: Master's Thesis Research

Staff/0-13/All

 

M&IM 377: Critical Issues in Cancer Research

This seminar/tutorial will examine primary research papers to develop critical thinking skills on current topics in cancer research, including cell growth control, signal transduction, regulation of gene expression, and programmed cell death. The discussions will focus on discredited and controversial areas as well as cutting edge studies. Students can write a paper for additional credit. This course is offered to graduate students and those postdoctoral fellows enrolled in the MSCI program at Vanderbilt University. Prerequisite (predoctoral students): IGP 300a, 300b, and 301 or equivalent. (Postdoctoral students): Course director approval.

Ruley/2-3/Summer

 

M&IM 379/PhD Dissertation Research

Non qualifying hour course for students in the Ph.D. program who have not yet passed their qualifying exam. Prequisite: IGP 300b or equivalent.

Staff/0-12/All

 

M&IM 399: PhD Dissertation Research

Staff/0-13/All

 

 

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