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Vanderbilt Pathology Laboratory Services

Test Directory



ADENOVIRUS BY PCR (ADV)

Department: Molecular Infectious Disease
Test Synonym(s): ADV, Adenovirus DNA
CPT Codes: 87798
Methodology: PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction)
Reference Range: Not detected
Tube Type: Sterile container - swab
Specimen: Nasal washing, nasal secretions, nasopharyngeal swabs
Alternate Specimen: Blood, stool, and eye/vitreous fluid will be accepted as nonpreferred specimen types, and results will be reported with a disclaimer. Note that enteric adenovirus strains are not reliably detected in this assay; stool specimens are recommended for referral testing to detect these agents. Blood should be collected in a lavender top (EDTA) tube. Stool specimens should be submitted in a sterile container. Eye/vitreous fluid should be submitted in a sterile container (preferably) or Universal Transport Medium. CSF specimens submitted for adenovirus PCR are sent to a reference lab. Contact the lab for specimen requirements of reference tests. Other specimen types require Medical Director approval; contact the lab prior to specimen collection for approval and collection instructions.
Pediatric Requirements: Nasal washing, nasal secretions, nasopharyngeal swabs
Volume: 1.0 mL
Minimum Volume: 0.5 mL
Temperature: Room Temperature: same day, refrigerated: overnight, frozen: longer than overnight
Stability: Room temperature: same day, refrigerated: overnight, frozen: longer than overnight
Reasons for Rejection: Alternative specimen sent without Medical Director approval
Days Performed: Tuesday and Friday
Times Performed: Once per day on Tuesday and Friday (batched)
TAT: 24 hours (Monday - Friday)
Significance: Human adenoviruses (AdV) cause a variety of diseases and are prevalent throughout the world. Common clinical manifestations resulting from AdV infection include pneumonia, cystitis, conjunctivitis, diarrhea, hepatitis, myocarditis, and encephalitis. In the general population, AdV often cause mild or self-limiting disease; however, severe disseminated disease can occur in immunocompromised individuals and can be fatal. The "gold standard" of diagnosis for AdV infection has been viral culture. Although culture provides a sensitive method for diagnosis, it can take as long as 3 weeks to achieve results. Immunofluorescence and other immunodiagnostic assays using direct antigen detection are more rapid than culture, but they lack sensitivity. Recently, PCR-based assays have been employed in clinical practice for the detection of AdV and have proven to be comparable or better than the classic methods. A real-time PCR targeting all serotypes in one reaction provides AdV detection in a rapid and efficient manner.
Special Instructions: Other sources or samples may be acceptable for this test; please check with the lab, 615-936-6435. Click here to print the Molecular Diagnostics requisition.

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