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ALUMNI JOURNAL AND CLASS NOTES :: WINTER 2014
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Alumni News

Updates on classmates


July 2009

'40s

Jack Fleming, M.D., HS ‘47-’49, and his wife, Carolyn, have written a book, “Thinking Places, Where Great Ideas Were Born,” (Trafford) . The book is a tale of many journeys, a collection of fresh insights into the lives of creative people based on their visits to the homes and thinking places of more than 30 creative people in the United States and Great Britain. The couple resides in Pensacola, Fla., and enjoys spending time with family, traveling, singing, songwriting, musical theatre, and Pensacola history. They have three children and nine grandchildren.

*Joseph Little, M.D., MD ‘43, HS ‘43-’44, turned 90 in March 2008. He welcomed a great-grandson who joins three great-granddaughters. He and his wife, Sarah, enjoy life at Richland Place Retirement Center in Nashville.

*Harris D. Riley Jr., M.D., MD ‘48, HS ‘50-’51, FE ‘53-54, emeritus professor of Pediatrics, is being honored with an endowed chair in his name from the Children’s Medical Research Institute (CMRI). CMRI will establish a $1 million endowed chair in pediatric education to honor Riley, the former chairman of the department. For more information about the Riley endowed chair, please contact Jill Smith at (405) 271-2550.

Somers Randolph, son of *Judson Randolph, M.D., MD 53, HS 54- 55, is a renowned sculptor living in Santa Fe, N.M. LeQuire Gallery recently exhibited his work, Alabama Marble, above. Gallery owner Alan LeQuire, is a son of Virgil LeQuire, M.D., MD 46, FE '49-'51.

Somers Randolph, son of *Judson Randolph, M.D., MD 53, HS 54- 55, is a renowned sculptor living in Santa Fe, N.M. LeQuire Gallery recently exhibited his work, Alabama Marble, above. Gallery owner Alan LeQuire, is a son of Virgil LeQuire, M.D., MD 46, FE '49-'51.

*Sarah Sell, M.D., MD ‘48, HS ‘48-’49, emerita professor of Pediatrics, says she is finally, completely retired, but still finds life to be busy as “there are many interesting things left that I had not time to do earlier.” She keeps in touch with her friends in the Department of Pediatrics. She has two sons, Charles, a leveraged buy-out specialist, and Clive, an ophthalmologist, and five grandchildren.

'50s

John Clariday, M.D., MD ‘51, lives in Mineola, Texas. He retired in 1985 and remains in good health. He enjoys fishing and golfing. He has been married for 60 years and has four children, seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

*Stanley Elmore, M.D., MD ‘58, HS ‘58-’60, ‘62-’65, FE ‘65-’66, recently attended his 50th Vanderbilt Medical School reunion, which he referred to as “a great celebration and reinvigorating to reflect on those four years together.” At the reunion he picked up a reproduction of his class commencement program and was reminded that he had received an award from the American Academy of Dental Medicine at graduation. Since Vanderbilt had no school of dentistry, he was a bit confused and felt undeserving. “It was speculated that I was the only one in our class who had done hard tissue (bone) research, and that qualified as interest in dentistry,” he mused.

Robert Kiger, M.D., MD 58, HS 58-59, recently published his first novel, His Kingdoms Come, which chronicles the clash between faith and science. Kiger is retired from private practice at the South Carolina Heart Center, and currently lives in Camden, S.C., with his wife, Shirley. They have two sons and three grandchildren. In addition to writing fiction and poetry, he enjoys traveling the world and elk hunting.

Robert Kiger, M.D., MD 58, HS 58-59, recently published his first novel, His Kingdoms Come, which chronicles the clash between faith and science. Kiger is retired from private practice at the South Carolina Heart Center, and currently lives in Camden, S.C., with his wife, Shirley. They have two sons and three grandchildren. In addition to writing fiction and poetry, he enjoys traveling the world and elk hunting.

Robert Sanders, M.D., MD ‘55, HS ‘55-’58 posthumously received the Alumni Achievement Award from the Vanderbilt Medical Center Alumni Association in October for his contribution to seat belt safety and awareness. His son, Robert, has written a biography of his father entitled “Dr. Seat Belt – The Life of Robert S. Sanders, M.D.” His daughter, Priscilla, is a graduate student at Peabody College. The Rutherford County Health Department building has been named for Sanders.

W. Carter Williams Jr., M.D., MD ‘56, HS '56 - '63, FE '59 retired from practice in December 2006.

'60s

Antonio Gotto, M.D., DPhil., MD ‘65, is in his 13th year as Dean of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York. He is enjoying leading a capital campaign to establish a new biomedical research building as well as to expand their branch in Qatar, which graduates its second class of physicians this year. Gotto travels extensively and particularly enjoys trips to Hong Kong with his wife, Anita, to visit their daughter and her family. The couple has three daughters and four grandchildren.

Robert Cochran Jr., M.D., MD 59, HS 59-60, published Curing Chronic Pain  Stories of Hope and Healing (Providence House). The book examines the relationship between chronic pain and delusions, hallucinations, phobias and other mental health conditions. Cochran has found that chronic pain can be alleviated with the careful application of certain drugs. The book is a companion to Understanding Chronic Pain.

Robert Cochran Jr., M.D., MD 59, HS 59-60, published Curing Chronic Pain  Stories of Hope and Healing (Providence House). The book examines the relationship between chronic pain and delusions, hallucinations, phobias and other mental health conditions. Cochran has found that chronic pain can be alleviated with the careful application of certain drugs. The book is a companion to Understanding Chronic Pain.

Daniel Hightower, M.D., MD ‘64, HS ‘64-69, lives in Nashville. He was featured in 2008 “Best Doctors in America,” 2008 “Cambridge Who’s Who V.I.P.,” and is on the board of directors of Bach Pharma, Inc. He has three daughters and one son.

Robert LeGrand, M.D., HS ‘68- ’70, ‘72-’76, is practicing neurosurgery in San Angelo, Texas. In recognition of his and his wife, Jean Ann’s, ongoing support and contributions to Angelo State University academics and athletics, the Board of Regents of the Texas Tech University System unanimously voted to award the couple the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters during May commencement. The couple has six children and two grandchildren.

*Newton Lovvorn Jr., M.D., MD ‘63, HS ‘64-’67, was inducted into the Seton Society of Saint Thomas Health Services. He retired from private practice in December 2008.

Robert Lowe, M.D., MD ‘64, HS ‘64-’70, was inducted into the Marshall University Sports Medicine Hall of Fame. Lowe was a team physician for Marshall from 1971 – 1990. The 9th Annual Hall of Fame ceremony was sponsored by the Cabell- Huntington Hospital. Lowe is a board-certified orthopaedic surgeon at Scott Orthopaedic Center and serves as president of the Tri-State Orthopaedic Society in Huntington, W.V.

Bill Chestnut, M.D., MD 67, HS 67-68, has an orthopaedic practice in Albuquerque, N.M., specializing in treating degenerative knee disease with hydraulic acid injections and in developing minimally invasive outpatient alternatives to total knee replacement.

Bill Chestnut, M.D., MD 67, HS 67-68, has an orthopaedic practice in Albuquerque, N.M., specializing in treating degenerative knee disease with hydraulic acid injections and in developing minimally invasive outpatient alternatives to total knee replacement.

Allen McCutchan, M.D., HS ‘68- ’70, retired this spring as professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. He continues to work part-time managing several international HIV/AIDS –related projects. Since 2005 he has directed a program of training and assistance for treatment for the Uniformed Services of Ethiopia. He continues to coordinate international studies of NeuroAIDS at the UCSD’s HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center.

Joseph Pryor, M.D., HS ‘64-’67, is a retired professor of Ob/Gyn at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine. He and his wife, Carol Ann, recently celebrated their 50th anniversary with family.

'70s

Brent Seagle, M.D., MD ‘67, HS ‘71-’72, was elected president of the Florida Cleft Palate- Craniofacial Association at its annual meeting in January. He also leads Interplast South in its ongoing mission to San Pedro Sula for cleft care twice a year.

Barbara Albers Jackson, Ph.D. 69, is a biochemist by day and screenplay writer by night. She is a professor of Chemistry at Tennessee Tech University and has been quite active as a writer and filmmaker. She is a member of the Writers Guild of America and has written 14 feature length scripts, 11 of which have won or placed in contests. While her scripts have not yet made it into production, two of her produced shorts have won awards: Heavenly received a Bronze Award at Worldfest Houston in 2002, and Forgotten Son received a Best Short Award at the International Family Film Festival in 2007. An abbreviated version of Forgotten Son can be found on You Tube. It is a fictionalized story about methamphetamine addiction seen from the point of view of a teenager whose mother is an addict. Jackson has written an adaptation of her award-winning feature animation script into a graphic novel, RAMA the Legend, which is published by Arcana Studios. This is a westernized version of the second most popular Hindu classic, The Ramayana. She has also written a stage play adaptation of her comedy script, The Marriage Contract.

Barbara Albers Jackson, Ph.D. 69, is a biochemist by day and screenplay writer by night. She is a professor of Chemistry at Tennessee Tech University and has been quite active as a writer and filmmaker. She is a member of the Writers Guild of America and has written 14 feature length scripts, 11 of which have won or placed in contests. While her scripts have not yet made it into production, two of her produced shorts have won awards: Heavenly received a Bronze Award at Worldfest Houston in 2002, and Forgotten Son received a Best Short Award at the International Family Film Festival in 2007. An abbreviated version of Forgotten Son can be found on You Tube. It is a fictionalized story about methamphetamine addiction seen from the point of view of a teenager whose mother is an addict. Jackson has written an adaptation of her award-winning feature animation script into a graphic novel, RAMA the Legend, which is published by Arcana Studios. This is a westernized version of the second most popular Hindu classic, The Ramayana. She has also written a stage play adaptation of her comedy script, The Marriage Contract.

*John Sergent, M.D., MD ‘66, HS '70 - '72, has written the book “Healing Words” (Cold Tree), a compilation of newspaper columns he has written over a 20-year period for the Tennessean. The 200-plus columns he has submitted have mostly related to medical and health policy issues, and occasionally personal topics. Sergent is a professor of Medicine and vice chair for Education and Residency Program Director at Vanderbilt.

Carol Waslien, Ph.D., FE ‘68-’71, has returned to the Middle East to assist with the development of an undergraduate program in dietetics at Kuwait University. She is still involved in research with the Ministry of Health and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. 70s

*Bruce Dan, M.D., MD ‘74, HS ‘74- ’78, FE ‘77-’80, adjunct associate professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine, has been named chief medical officer and executive medical editor for NBC Universal Digital Health Network and recently won the International Health and Medical Media Award for Outstanding Health and Wellness Program for his work on The Patient Channel.

Henry Foster Jr., M.D., FA ‘77 – 00, former interim president of Meharry Medical College and clinical professor of Ob/Gyn at Vanderbilt, received the National Medical Association (NME) 2008 Scroll of Merit Award, given in recognition of Foster’s “distinguished career in medicine, spanning more than four decades in domestic and international health and administration as a leading proponent of quality health care for African-Americans and the disadvantaged including those in the rural South.”

Edward Oldfield, M.D., HS 73- 80, was presented with the 2009 Cushing Medal, the highest honor granted by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons at the AANS Annual Meeting in San Diego. He is a professor of Neurosurgery and Internal Medicine at the University of Virginia.

Edward Oldfield, M.D., HS 73- 80, was presented with the 2009 Cushing Medal, the highest honor granted by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons at the AANS Annual Meeting in San Diego. He is a professor of Neurosurgery and Internal Medicine at the University of Virginia.

Robert Friedman, M.D., HS ‘76- ’79, has accepted a position as Director, Pain Medicine at the Charleston, S.C., VAMC. He is working to develop an interdisciplinary pain program to serve the needs of all veterans, especially those returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

*David Gershenson, M.D., MD ‘71, was elected chair of the Gynecologic Cancer Foundation, a non-profit organization established in 1991 by the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists. He is editor emeritus of Gynecologic Oncology, having served as editor-in-chief from 1990-2008. With the help of GCF, he hopes to expand research programs and find more opportunities to serve his community.

*Clark Gregg, M.D., HS ‘72-’78, FE ‘77-’79, is the incoming governor for the Texas Northern District of the American College of Physicians.

Stephen Hines, M.D., MD ‘77, HS ‘77-’80, has been elected into Fellowship of the American College of Physicians and was officially inducted in the convocation ceremony in Philadelphia in April.

*A. Everette James, M.D., FA ‘75 – 00, former chair of the Department of Radiology, and his wife, Nancy, have been inducted into the Riddick Society of North Carolina State University. The Riddick Society, created in 1994, honors lifetime support in the form of outright gifts or irrevocable planned gifts. James was the president of the NCSU Veterinary School Foundation. They have also been inducted into the James B. Duke Society of Duke University. James is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board of the Johns School of Public Health.

John Neblett Jr., M.D., MD ‘77, HS ‘77-83, and his wife, Victoria, have one son, John Phillips, a starting lineman and honor student at Knoxville Catholic High School. Neblett served as 2008 lay leader at Grace United Methodist Church and travels annually with Victoria as a surgeon with the Medical Mission Ecuador.

*Gary Nicolaisen, M.D., MD ‘79, was recognized with the prestigious Kaiser Permanente (KP) Leadership Award in May. He is chair of the Chiefs of Urology in the organization’s 19-hospital system. He is also responsible for surgical services in the KP Northern California hospital in San Rafael.

Gary Goforth, M.D., MD 80, pictured here with his wife, Kathy, MA 78, served in Kabul, Afghanistan at CURE International Hospital from July 2008 to June 2009 in the development of the countrys only Family Medicine Residency Program. He served as a key leader in the development of Hope Family Medicine Afghanistan and the Academy of Family Medicine. These organizations will oversee development of Family Medicine residency training, certification and recertification examinations, and continuing medical education for family medicine graduates within Afghanistan. The new flagship hospital, Afshar Hospital, provides critical medical services to women and girls in a predominantly Hazara ethnic area of the city, which was completely destroyed during the civil infighting of the 90s. The hospital opened for patients in April, and Goforth plans to begin residency training in July. Their greatest need is assuring funding for the training program, but they have several great partners in the United States. Our goal is to supply family physicians to district and provincial hospitals throughout Afghanistan, Goforth writes. I am excited to be involved in the development of Hope Family Medicine Afghanistan. I came to Afghanistan to make a difference in developing primary care services in this very troubled nation.

Gary Goforth, M.D., MD 80, pictured here with his wife, Kathy, MA 78, served in Kabul, Afghanistan at CURE International Hospital from July 2008 to June 2009 in the development of the countrys only Family Medicine Residency Program. He served as a key leader in the development of Hope Family Medicine Afghanistan and the Academy of Family Medicine. These organizations will oversee development of Family Medicine residency training, certification and recertification examinations, and continuing medical education for family medicine graduates within Afghanistan. The new flagship hospital, Afshar Hospital, provides critical medical services to women and girls in a predominantly Hazara ethnic area of the city, which was completely destroyed during the civil infighting of the 90s. The hospital opened for patients in April, and Goforth plans to begin residency training in July. Their greatest need is assuring funding for the training program, but they have several great partners in the United States. Our goal is to supply family physicians to district and provincial hospitals throughout Afghanistan, Goforth writes. I am excited to be involved in the development of Hope Family Medicine Afghanistan. I came to Afghanistan to make a difference in developing primary care services in this very troubled nation.

'80s

Samuel Bouchillon, M.D., HS ‘80 –’82, is the medical director, vice president and principal owner of International Health Management Associates, Inc., in Schaumburg, Ill., a CRO specializing in international drug studies.

Ken Devault, M.D., HS ‘86-’89, is the chair of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and associate chair for Quality in the Department of Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida. He is a professor of Medicine and a former trustee of the American College of Gastroenterology. He and his wife, Shelley, have six children and are very active in the support of children’s issues in China.

Eduardo Fraifeld, M.D., HS ‘88- ’91, is president-elect of the American Academy of Pain Medicine and currently serves on the board of directors of the Southern Pain Society, Virginia Society of Anesthesiologists and the Virginia Medical Society PAC. After 12 years, he left Danville Regional Medical Center in Virginia and has opened Southside Pain Solutions. He has two sons, Sam and Ben.

*Bill Frist, M.D., FA ‘86-00, professor of Medicine and Business, has introduced and taught a unique course on health economics that is comprised of 12 medical students and 12 business students. The course integrates health policy, business principles, and state-federal reform. The course will be repeated in the fall. Former U.S. Sen. Frist founded the Vanderbilt Multi-Organ Transplant Center and served as majority leader of the U.S. Senate. He has been on the Vanderbilt faculty since 1985.

Melanie Levitan, M.D., MD ‘83, has had a private practice in Family Medicine for the last 14 years. The practice has an integrative model with acupuncture, nutrition, psychotherapy and functional medicine offered as complements to traditional therapies. Melanie and her husband, Joel, just celebrated their 27th anniversary. They live in the Berkshires and have two children, Jocelyn, 24, and Matt, 22. They enjoy cross-country skiing, hiking, tennis, bicycling and yoga.

Rex M. McCallum, M.D., MD ‘80, is the Governor of the North Carolina Chapter of the American College of Physicians, the national organization of internists. His term began in April. A resident of Durham, N.C., McCallum is a professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at Duke University, where he also serves as Associate Director of the Private Diagnostic Clinic, PLLC.

*Mace Rothenberg, M.D., HS ‘82- ’85, is starting a new chapter in his career after 20 years in academic medicine. In December he became senior vice president at Pfizer, responsible for oncology clinical development and medical affairs worldwide. He and his family continue to live in Nashville, but he will be splitting his time professionally between New York, New London, Conn., La Jolla, Calif., and Milan.

Amin Barakat, M.D., FA 86  89, clinical professor of Pediatrics at Georgetown University Medical Center, recently published a book, Pediatric Nephrology for Primary Care (Barakat, AJ, and Chesney RW, American Academy of Pediatrics, 2009). The 511-page book is part of a series by the Academy on different specialties for primary care physicians and is a clear, concise overview of pediatric nephrology that primary care physicians, residents and medical students find very useful.

Amin Barakat, M.D., FA 86  89, clinical professor of Pediatrics at Georgetown University Medical Center, recently published a book, Pediatric Nephrology for Primary Care (Barakat, AJ, and Chesney RW, American Academy of Pediatrics, 2009). The 511-page book is part of a series by the Academy on different specialties for primary care physicians and is a clear, concise overview of pediatric nephrology that primary care physicians, residents and medical students find very useful.

Chris Sarzen, M.D., MD ‘88, HS ‘88-’92, is in private practice in Atlanta, specializing in digestive diseases. An accomplished pianist, he enjoys the opportunity to perform with other musicians, including recitals with members of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. He has performed benefits to provide scholarships for young musicians. He was the winner of the Pro-Mozart Society of Atlanta’s 2008 Scholarship for study at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria.

Herbert Schwartz, M.D., FA ‘87 – present, professor of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, has been named chair of the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation. Schwartz fills the role previously held by longtime departmental leader Dan Spengler, M.D.

'90s

Robert Hoover, M.D., HS ‘90-’93, returned to CIGNA Government Services as the senior medical director for the Medical Fee-For- Service contract. He is responsible for coverage and coding of durable medical equipment, prosthetics and orthotics in the southeastern United States. He resides in Nashville with his wife, Elizabeth, and two children, Robert and Brinton.

Monita Soni, M.D., HS ‘95-’97, grew up in Mumbai, which at the time was called Bombay. She still has family there including her parents, sister and other relatives. It was with great anxiety that she
listened to news reports about a series of terror attacks in the city
that left 200 people dead in November 2008. Soni, a pathologist in
Decatur, Ala., was at work when she heard the news of the attacks. She immediately called her family to make sure they were OK, and they were. Soon after the attacks, Soni returned to India.

In other news, her daughter, Abha, recently earned a Master’s degree in Epidemiology and is heading to medical school. Abha
recently participated in the 27th Annual Nationwide Miss India USA
2008 pageant where she received Miss Popularity and Miss
Congeniality honors.


David Myers, M.D.,
MD ‘97, finished a pediatric nephrology fellowship at Seattle Children’s Hospital in June and earned an M.S. degree in Clinical Epidemiology and Research Design with certificate in public health genetics at the University of Washington. He will start as an assistant professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Nephrology at the University of Iowa Children’s Hospital in July.

Sovana Moore, M.D., MD 00, HS 00-01, and her husband, Steve, welcomed their first child, Shelby, on Dec. 17, 2008. She weighed 6 lbs., 1 oz., and was 18 ¼ inches long.

Sovana Moore, M.D., MD 00, HS 00-01, and her husband, Steve, welcomed their first child, Shelby, on Dec. 17, 2008. She weighed 6 lbs., 1 oz., and was 18 ¼ inches long.

Esther Maksymovitch Penn, M.D., MD’98, spent six months at home with her newborn daughter, Misha, and has returned to work with another Kaiser Permanente facility in Petaluma, Calif.

Seenu Reddy, M.D., M.B.A., HS ‘95-’02, is an assistant professor of Surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center, specializing in minimally invasive coronary artery bypass surgery.

George Shanno, M.D., MD ‘95, is in private practice in Vancouver, Wash., in a large combined orthopaedic and neurosurgical group called Rebound, practicing neurovascular and general neurosurgery. He serves on the board of Southwest Washington Medical Center. He and his wife, Lucy, have two sons, Hugh and Theo. They spend their free time skiing on Mt. Hood in the winter and biking in the summer.

Gargi Gajendragadkar Gandhi, M.D., MD 01, welcomed a son, Kavi, on Feb. 12. He joins his big brother, Shaan, 3.

Gargi Gajendragadkar Gandhi, M.D., MD 01, welcomed a son, Kavi, on Feb. 12. He joins his big brother, Shaan, 3.

2000-

Laurie Archbald-Pannone, M.D., MD ‘02, and her husband, Aaron, welcomed their second child, Teresa Lauren, on Aug. 20, 2008. Their son, Joshua, was born June 17, 2006. Laurie joined the faculty at the University of Virginia in 2008. She is an assistant professor in Internal Medicine and has received NIH funding to perform clinical research on infections in hospital and long-term care settings.

Bryan Cotton, M.D., FA ‘04-’07, recently accepted and started a new position as associate professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center and an appointment to the Center for Translational Injury Research, both in Houston.

David Morris, M.D., MD 03, and his wife, Betsy, welcomed their first child, Avery, in late 2007. Morris is completing his residency in Urology at the University of Michigan and is moving back to Nashville to join Urology Associates PC. He will be working in the Hendersonville and Gallatin areas.

David Morris, M.D., MD 03, and his wife, Betsy, welcomed their first child, Avery, in late 2007. Morris is completing his residency in Urology at the University of Michigan and is moving back to Nashville to join Urology Associates PC. He will be working in the Hendersonville and Gallatin areas.

Elise Fallucco, M.D., MD ‘04, finished her child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship in June and is staying on as a faculty member at Washington University for the next year while her husband, Michael, finishes his fellowship in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

Travis Hansen, M.D., HS ‘00-’01, has been named new medical director for the South Dakota Human Services Center. Hansen joined the staff at the Human Services Center in 2005 after residency work at Vanderbilt and the University of Kentucky. He specializes in adult general psychiatry and child adolescent psychiatry. Hansen says the new position is a chance to make some changes in the name of improved patient care.

Bennett Hooks, M.D., HS ‘02-’05, was elected into Alpha Omega Alpha as a fellow at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine. He is moving to San Antonio, Texas, with his wife, Beth, and their two daughters, Isabelle and Lillian, for a one-year advanced endoscopy GI fellowship.

Bernard Rousseau, Ph.D., FA 05- present, (left) assistant professor of Otolaryngology, received the 2008 Young Faculty Award from the American Laryngological Association in recognition of his work involving Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression after Vocal Fold Injury in a Rabbit Model. Tnuneshia Ohno, M.D., FE 07- 09, (right) an alumnus of Rousseauss lab, will receive the 2009 Young Faculty award from the American Laryngological Association in recognition of work entitled, Regeneration of Aged Rat Vocal Folds Using Hepatocyte Growth Factor Therapy.

Bernard Rousseau, Ph.D., FA 05- present, (left) assistant professor of Otolaryngology, received the 2008 Young Faculty Award from the American Laryngological Association in recognition of his work involving Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression after Vocal Fold Injury in a Rabbit Model. Tnuneshia Ohno, M.D., FE 07- 09, (right) an alumnus of Rousseauss lab, will receive the 2009 Young Faculty award from the American Laryngological Association in recognition of work entitled, Regeneration of Aged Rat Vocal Folds Using Hepatocyte Growth Factor Therapy.

*BethAnn McLaughlin, M.D., FA ‘02 – present, assistant professor of Neurology, has been appointed to the editorial board of the Journal of Neuroscience as an associate editor in the cellular and molecular section for a three-year period.

Lt. Commander Tim Oeltmann, M.D., MD ‘04, a flight surgeon and naval aviator in the U.S. Marine Corps, received the 2007 Richard E. Luehrs Memorial Award, selected from among 250 nominees. The Luehrs Award is given annually to recognize outstanding performance in operational aviation medicine practice by a first- or second-tour Naval Flight Surgeon of the rank of Lieutenant or Lieutenant Commander. Selection is based on leadership qualities, dedication, initiative, resourcefulness and industriousness in carrying out their duties with the operational forces.

Alyssa Throckmorton, M.D., HS ‘02-’07, and Quin Throckmorton, M.D., HS ‘07, are moving back to Tennessee in the fall. Quin will begin a shoulder and elbow reconstruction practice with the Campbell Clinic in Memphis, and Alyssa will start as a breast surgeon for the Baptist Women’s Hospital. They are expecting their first child in August.

Julie Thwing, M.D., MD ‘02, HS ‘02-’06, married Edward Hopkins III, an electrical engineer with Georgia Tech Research Institute, on July 26, 2008. She is a medical epidemiologist with the Malaria Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She spends most of her time on malaria research in the sub-Saharan.

Brock Schweitzer, Ph.D., (right) president of the Post-Doctoral Association and VMAA Board member, joined Ann Price, M.D., executive director of the VMAA (left), at the Postdoctoral Research and Shared Resource Symposium. Price presented a check to the Post Doc of the Year recipient, Lydia Wroblewski, Ph.D.

Brock Schweitzer, Ph.D., (right) president of the Post-Doctoral Association and VMAA Board member, joined Ann Price, M.D., executive director of the VMAA (left), at the Postdoctoral Research and Shared Resource Symposium. Price presented a check to the Post Doc of the Year recipient, Lydia Wroblewski, Ph.D.

Bridget Lauro, M.D., MD 01, and her husband, Joe, welcomed daughter, Anneliese Victoria, on Sept. 3, 2008. They live in Evergreen, Colo., and both practice medicine in Denver. She is on the partnership track with Rocky Mountain Radiologists, PC, and he is a partner with Emergency Medicine Physicians.

Bridget Lauro, M.D., MD 01, and her husband, Joe, welcomed daughter, Anneliese Victoria, on Sept. 3, 2008. They live in Evergreen, Colo., and both practice medicine in Denver. She is on the partnership track with Rocky Mountain Radiologists, PC, and he is a partner with Emergency Medicine Physicians.

Angela Eeds, M.D., Ph.D. 06, and husband, Gary, are the proud parents of son, Isaac David, born Feb. 11. Angela is an instructor and director of Student Research at the School for Science and Math at Vanderbilt.

Angela Eeds, M.D., Ph.D. 06, and husband, Gary, are the proud parents of son, Isaac David, born Feb. 11. Angela is an instructor and director of Student Research at the School for Science and Math at Vanderbilt.

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