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WRITTEN BY LEIGH MACMILLAN
ILLUSTRATION BY ELIZABETH LADA

Polar views in the embryonic
stem cell controversy

Scott Wright's peaceful nights ended almost four
years ago. That's when his now 6-year-old daughter
Emma was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, and a
day-and-night routine of blood glucose checks and
insulin injections began.

The mental strain is wearing, says Wright, who rises
twice each night to prick Emma's fingers.

"I constantly think, 'is she going to be
okay tonight?
'"

 

He and his wife, who just two years ago also was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, worry about the long-term complications of the disease -- the blindness, kidney disease, nerve disease, amputations, heart disease and stroke.

"I try to block those thoughts out, but they're there," Wright says.

Wright supports research aimed at better understanding diabetes -- in fact, he works as a research assistant in the Vanderbilt Diabetes Center, hoping that the investigators there will find new ways to treat or even cure the disease. But when it comes to embryonic stem cell research, oft-cited as having the potential to cure diabetes, he hesitates. continued..

 
 
  Vanderbilt launches
stem cell center
   
   
 
 
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