Menu

Research

Translating research into personalized care

Home > Phenotyping and Pathophysiology > Blood pressure measurements > BP telemetry

BP telemetry > Background Section

Implantable mouse BP transmitters (TA11PA-C20, Data Sciences International, St. Paul, MN) will be used to directly measure arterial pressure in individual, conscious and freely moving mice (20, 21). Details of the methods used are included on the protocol page for this segment.

Implantable mouse BP transmitters (TA11PA-C20, Data Sciences International, St. Paul, MN) will be used to directly measure arterial pressure in individual, conscious and freely moving mice (20, 21). The mice will be anesthetized with a ketamine-xylazine mixture. The carotid artery of the mouse is accessed with a ventral midline incision. The left carotid artery is isolated with fine-tipped vessel dilation forceps. Two occlusion sutures are placed beneath the artery. The elevated artery is punctured with a catheter introducer, and the telemetry catheter was inserted into the vessel. The catheter tip was advanced into the thoracic aorta so that 3 mm of the thin-walled tip section could reside in the aorta. The sutures will be tied and secured with tissue adhesive. Through the same ventral incision a subcutaneous tunnel will be formed across the right pectoral area and enlarged to form a pocket along the right flank. The body of the transmitter is slipped into the pocket and secured with tissue adhesive. The ventral incision is then closed with suture.

All mice are allowed 10 days of recovery from transmitter implantation surgery before any measurements are made. This time interval is necessary for the mice to regain their circadian blood pressure and heart rate rhythm. Thereafter, BP and HR were telemetrically recorded and stored with the Dataquest ART data acquisition system (Data Sciences International). The baseline measures will be averaged for a period of 1-7 days before subjecting the animal to the desired physiologic maneuver (e.g. high salt diet, L-NAME treatment). Blood pressure and heart rate data will be collected over a period of days to weeks.

Publications for BP telemetry (1)

Kramer K, Kinter L, Brockway BP, Voss HP, Remie R, Van Zutphen BL. The use of radiotelemetry in small laboratory animals: recent advances. Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci (2001) 40:8-16
View abstract View in PubMed

Radiotelemetry provides an alternative means of obtaining physiological measurements from awake and freely moving laboratory animals, without introducing stress artifacts. For researchers, especially those in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, the technique may provide a valuable tool for predicting the effectiveness and safety of new compounds in humans. In light of studies described in the literature, it is concluded that there is ample evidence that the use of radiotelemetry for measuring blood pressure, cardiac activity, heart rate, body temperature, and locomotor activity in rodents has been validated sufficiently. Today, this technology is an important tool for the stress-free collection of these physiologic data in small rodents, including mice.

ServiceCost (Vanderbilt)Cost (non-Vanderbilt)

Click on the service name to request the service.


Additional content related to BP telemetry

Background
Protocols
Literature


Last updated on 2013-11-06 Moderated by Jimmy Hao