Called to Serve

From the Winter 2015 edition of Vanderbilt Medicine Magazine

Within days of arriving in Liberia in September 2014, Boris Pavlin, M.D., ‘03, cared for three patients with Ebola—a mother, father and young son. It was his first face-to-face contact with the rare and deadly infectious disease that was raging … Continued

A nation takes notice

From the Winter 2015 edition of Vanderbilt Medicine Magazine

Ebola virus disease, previously known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is caused by infection with four of the five Ebola virus strains, and can cause disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees). Ebola was first discovered in 1976 … Continued

The Long Road Back

From the Winter 2015 edition of Vanderbilt Medicine Magazine

In early September 2014, Ian Crozier, M.D.,’97, supervised the jet evacuation of a critically ill patient from Kenema, the epicenter of the raging Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. An exhausted Crozier told the medical team that he hoped he didn’t … Continued

What is a food allergy?

From the Summer 2014 edition of Vanderbilt Medicine Magazine

An allergic reaction to a food is a two-step process. The first time you’re exposed to a food allergen, your immune system makes specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to that allergen. The IgE antibodies circulate through your blood and attach … Continued

Off Limits

From the Summer 2014 edition of Vanderbilt Medicine Magazine

According to Food Allergy Research and Education, about 1.5 million Americans have food allergies. They affect 1 in every 13 children under 18 in the U. S.—or about two in every classroom. Those who have them must approach food with a great deal of caution.